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LIBRARY OF 



LASELL JUNIOR COLLEGE 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



19 

4 & 7 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/allerlei1912unse 



Zhc Hllerlei 
1012 



(3reeting 




T3EHOLD the Allerlei! In presenting- this to yon, we wish 
-■-' neither to dwell on its faults nor on its merits. These are 
for the reader to judge. You will doubtless find many of the 
former ; we hope that you may, if you are diligent, discover 
the latter. If you find any grinds which strike you as par- 
ticularly harsh, remember that "Every knock is a boost," and 
smile. It must be remembered that this volume is our first attempt. With the 
experience we now have, we might produce a better book, should we try again, 
but we kindly resign to 1913. 

Our work at last is done. Although our task has at times seemed arduous 
we have enjoyed it. We have done our utmost to make this Allerlei the best 
ever, and we hope that it may contain something of interest to you. 

The Staff. 



[ 5 ] 





Miss Margaret Rand 

To whom we dedicate our Year Book 



[ 7 ] 




Rev. W. C. Gordon, Ph. D. 

Our Honorary Member 



[ 9 ] 




Dr. G. M. Winslow 

Our Principal 



[ 11 ] 




Mrs. G. M. Winslow 

And Little Lasellites 



[ 13 ] 



THE S2LLERLEI 



Hllerlef Staff 



Editor-in-Chief 
Mildred Hall 



Athletic Editor 
Agnes Adelsdorf 



Associate Editors 

Marion Joslin 
Genevieve White 
Gertrude Tingle y 

Business Managers 

Clara Parker 
Rachel Chambers 
Esther Morey 

Social Editor 
Ruth Graham 

Personal Editors 

Edith Waller 
Florence Poston 



Subscription Agents 

Marion Spelger 
Florence Jones 
Ora Hammond 



Artists 

Hazel Bower 
Edith Waller 



Advertising Agents 

Annie Merrill 
Mary Starr Utter 
Lillian Beuhner 



See Page 89. 



[ 15 ] 



THE SSLLERLEI 



Zhe tfacult^ 

Guy M. Winslow, Ph.D., Principal 

Evelyn J. Winslow, A.B., Asst. Prin., 

Biology, Physics, Chemistry 

Lillie R. Potter, Preceptress 

Lillian M. Packard, A.B., 
Mathematics 

Mary P. WithErbee, 

English, Literature 

Ethel W. Chapman, Ph.B., 
English 

Jeanne Le Royer, 
French 

Madeleine Carret, 

Jeanne C heron 
Assistants in French 

Desdemona Louise Heinrich, A.B., 
German 

Margaret Rand, A.B., 

History, Philosophy, Economics 

Grace W. Irwin, 
Latin, Greek 

Henry W. Godfrey, A.B., M.D., 
Physiology 

Mary Augusta Mullikin 

Drawing, Painting, History of Art, 

House Decoration 

Frances King Dolley, 

Director of Household Economics, 
Sewing, Dressmaking 

ROXANA TUTTLE, 

Sewing, Dressmaking 
[ 16 ] 



THE &FLLERLEI 



Ethel G. Wooldridge, B.S., 
Cooking, Applied Housekeeping 

Martha Ransom Hazelet, 
Household Economics, Swimming 

Luna K. French, A.B., 

Millicent E. Arnold, 

Millinery 

Annie Payson Call, 
Nerve 'Training 

Blanche C. Martin 
Reading, Expression 

Henry M. Dunham, 

Director of the Department of Music. 

Organ, Harmony, Chorus Singing 

Joseph A. Hills, 

Louisa F. Parkhurst, 

Alice R. Hall, 

George Dunham 

Pianoforte 

Priscilla White, 

Helen Goodrich, 

Voice Culture 



S. E. Goldstein, 
Violin 

George W. Bemis, 
Guitar, Mandolin 

Mary L. Nutt, 
Resident Nurse 

Mabel J. W. Mosher, 
Assistant Nurse 

Nellie M. Warner, 
Physical 'Training 



Lois E. Williams, 
Swimming 

Capt. Charles A. Ranlett, 

Military Drill 

Walter R. Amesbury, 
Book-keeping, Penmanship 

Alice M. Hotchkiss 

Librarian 

Angeline C. Blaisdell, 
Treasurer 



[ 17 ] 



THE &?LLERLEI 



Zhe Senior Class 

Gladys Lawton, President. 
Ruth Butterworth, Vice-President. 
May Martincourt, Secretary. 
Helen Sayre, Treasurer. 
Elizabeth Brandow, Yell-Master. 





Gladys Lawton 

Sheffield, 111. 

Supe, Annie Merrill 



Ruth Butterworth 

Marion, Ind. 

Supe, Ruth Bachelder 



[ 18 ] 



THE &ZLLERLEI 




May Martincourt 

Butler, Penn. 

Supe, Florence Poston 



Helen Sayre 

Flushing, Mich. 

Supe, Pamela Spargo 





Elizabeth Brandow 

Albany, N. Y. 

Supe, Winifred Whittlesey 



[ 19 ] 



THE &FLLERLEI 




Georgia Boswell 

Coffeyville, Kan. 

Supe, Emily Butterworth 



Vera Bradley 

Stonington, Conn. 

Supe, Mary Starr Utter 





Nina Dietz 

Lincoln, Neb. 

Supe, Lillian Lane 



[ 20 ] 



THE S2LLERLEI 




Alma Dumn 

Reading, Penn. 

Supe, Ruth Coulter 



Marguerite Haley 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Supe, Clyde Bonebrake 





Grace Harvey 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Supe, Edith Waller 



[ 21 ] 



THE ALLERLEI 




Marie Hibbing 

Duluth, Minn. 

Supe, Charline Billington 



Margaret Jones 

Evanston, 111. 

Supe, Mildred Hall 





Edna Kauffman 

Reading, Penn. 

Supe, Genevieve White 



[ 22 ] 



THE &2LLERLEI 




Katherine Kelly 

Springfield, Ohio 

Supe, Gertrude Tingley 



Kathleen Knight 

Brockton, Mass. 

Supe, Ora Hammond 





Virginia Lee 
Bayside, L. I., N. Y. 
Supe, Hazel Bower 



[ 23 ] 



THE S£LLERLEI 




Edna MacDonald 

Guanajuato, Mex. 

Supe, Bernice Lincoln 



Frieda Mayer 

Chicago, 111. 

Supe, Mary Goodwillie 





Louise Mayer 

Chicago, 111. 

Supe, Marjorie Risser 



[ 24 ] 



THE SXLLERLEI 




Marion Ordway 

Orleans, Vt. 

Supe, Miriam Flynn 



Doris Powers 

Portland, Me. 

Supe, Lillian Beuhner 





Marion Shinn 
Atlantic City, N. J. 
Supe, Marion Joslin 



[ 25 ] 



THE &$LLERLEI 




Eleanor Warner 

Duluth, Minn. 

Supe, Florence Jones 



Helen Thirkield 
Washington, D. C. 
Supe, Vivian Cooke 





Barbara Dennen 

Waltham, Mass. 

Supe, Marion Spelger 



[ 26 ] 



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[ 28 ] 



THE &$LLERLEI 



"Speaking of 1911 



ft 




HE fall of '06 ushered in the Class of 1911, and of this 
"prep" period of our existence, but one survives, Nina Dietz, 
who contrary to the general law of growth, remains the 
tiniest girl in the class. Nina hails from Lincoln, Nebraska 
and brings with her, as has been proved in class meetings, 
her share of Middle West independence. 

The following year brought to us from sunny Mexico, Edna MacDonald, 
(spelled M-a-c, if you please), alias "Micky", whose sweater now boasts every 
symbol of victory known to Lasell. Edna was president of the Class during its 
Sophomore year. The same September gave us Grace Harvey, who despite the 
fact that her affections are divided between us and her nearby home in Jamaica 
Plain, has in her quick, steadfast way stuck by 1911. 

This trio welcomed in '08 six new members ; Beth Brandow, from Albany, 
New York, known to all as the prettiest girl in the school, with a character to 
match ; Gladys Lawton of Sheffield, Illinois, our beloved Senior president, artist, 
and successor to Mrs. Martin(?); Helen Thirkield, of Washington, D. C, 
to whom we owe a big vote of thanks for editing an Allerlei so successful that 
we were able to enter on our books a good sized sum as its proceeds ; Georgia 
Boswell, from Coffeyville, Kansas, who will, we prophesy, some day take a 
prize as the ideal home-maker of the Class ; Ruth Butterworth of Marion, In- 
diana, Class vice-president and "man of business" ; and last, Marion Ordway 
from Vermont's green hills, who as president, piloted us safely through our 
strenuous Junior year. 

September of 1909 gave us a wealth of material. The famous "Pretzel 
Twins" of Reading, Pennsylvania, Edna Kauffman and Alma Dumn, came to 
gladden our hearts, while from the western part of the same state, petite May 
Martincourt, present Class secretary, arrived wearing her best society air. The 
ocean breezes from Atlantic City blew in Marion Shinn, and almost at the 
same time we welcomed "Kelly" or "K. K.", less familiar as Katherine Kelly, 
of Springfield, Ohio. Duluth, Minnesota, sent us Marie Hibbing whose "nods 
and becks and wreathed smiles," bring joy to the multitude ; and from nearby 
Waltham came demure, canoedoving Barbara Dennen. At this time, too. 
"always cheerful" Margaret Jones found her way from Evanston, Illinois, back 
to the Alma Mater of the greater part of the Jones family. 



[ 29 ] 



THE &?LLERLEI 



With this illustrious crew, Lasell 1911 opened its Junior year, and so 
attractive did it appear that within four or five weeks, Kathleen Knight, the 
poet laureate of the school, joined our ranks. Little did Brockton, Massachu- 
setts, realize the budding genius within her gates ! Influenced, no doubt, by 
this worthy example, "artistic" Doris Powers of Portland, Maine, transferred 
her allegiance to the "black and gold," and hard upon her came three college 
"preps", happy-go-lucky, absent-minded Virginia Lee of Bayside, New York; 
and "original" Helen Sayre from Flushing, Michigan, who, in the capacity of 
Class treasurer, has by her level-headedness brought 1911 through many a 
crisis, both financial and otherwise ; and Vera Bradley of Stonington, Con- 
necticut, our "baby" Senior. At mid-year, two Chicago' girls, Louise Mayer, 
surnamed "The Graceful", and her sister, Frieda, "The Big Hearted" became 
members. 

This brings us to the beginning of the present year. To our joy 
Marguerite Haley of Sioux City, Iowa, survived the strenuous Senior examin- 
ations, and was entered upon our roll. Last but far from the least, 1911 gladly 
welcomed after Christmas, a second Duluth girl, Eleanor Warner, who had on 
account of illness dropped out of 1910's ranks. 

Since this is positively our last appearance in an Allerlei, we hope that 
we have succeeded in giving the public a favorable impression of this, the 
Class of 1911. 



"Sufficient unto the year is the glory thereof." 




[ 30 ] 



THE StfLLERLEI 



Zhc flight Before 

Sleeping tonight on the guest-room floor 

Lie Seniors, thirteen strong. 
Sleeping behind a fast-locked door, 

They dream the whole night long. 

Dream, then tonight, dream, then, tonight 

Of your cherished cap and gown. 

But oh ! what dreadful caps and gowns 

They find in dreamland there ! 
The sight of awful bright green plaid 

Makes every heart despair. 

Dreaming, my dears, dreaming, my dears, 

Let not a dream dismay. 

In dreams the Juniors wait outside 

Ready to sack the Hold ; 
To capture every cap and gown 

With steady hearts and bold. 

Courage, my friends ! Courage, my friends ! 

'Tis naught but a frightful dream. 

When morning breaks, they don their gowns, 

And march in stern array, 
And not a Junior so unkind 

As to wish to block their way. 

Remember your dreams ! Remember your dreams ! 

Dreams of the night before. 

M. K. Flynn. 



[ 31 ] 




[ 32 ] 



THE &FLLERLEI 




w 

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o 

I— I 

z 

D 



DC 
H 



[ M ] 



THE ALLERLEI 



Zbe Junior Class 



Miriam Flynn, 
Mary Starr Utter, 
Marion Joslin 
Annie Merrill 
Mildred Hall, 
Mary Goodwillie, 

Where from 
Agnes Adelsdorf — Nashville, Tennessee. 
Grace Alexander — Springfield, Massachusetts. 
Dorothea Africa — Manchester, New Hampshire. 
Ruth Bachelder — Gardiner, Maine. 
May Beardsley — Stratford, Connecticut. 
Hazel Bower — Poughkeepsie, New York. 
Clyde Bonebrake — Topeka, Kansas. 
Charline Billington — Pueblo, Colorado. 
Lillian Beuhner — Portland, Oregon. 
Emily Butterworth — Marion, Indiana. 
Rachel Chambers — Williamsport, Pennsylvania. 
Vivian Cooke — Newark, New Jersey. 
Ruth Coulter — Bridgeport, Connecticut. 
Maude Dunlap — New Haven, Connecticut. 
Elsie Fies — Birmingham, Alabama. 
Miriam Flynn — Millis, Massachusetts. 
Mary Goodwillie — Oak Park, Illinois. 
Ruth Graham — East Orange, New Jersey. 
Mildred Hall — Montgomery Center, Vermont. 
Ora Hammond — Rockville, Connecticut. 
Elsie Holtzman — Schenectady, New York. 
Elsie E. Huebner — Toledo, Ohio. 
Florence Jones — Evanston, Illinois. 
Marion Joslin — St. Paul, Minnesota. 
Lillian Lane — Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Charlotte Lesh — Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Bernice Lincoln — Taunton, Massachusetts. 
Annie Merrill — Enosburg Falls, Vermont. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Yell-Master 

Sentinel 



Room 
7 
9 
72 
75 
Clark 9 
8 
53 
Clark 9 
62 
8 
45 
Karadon 
Hawthorne 
45 
19 
75 
24 
13 
Carter Hall A 
35 
40 
55 
6 
Carter E 
Karandon 
5 
Clark 
Carter H 



[ 34 ] 



THE &FLLERLEI 



Where from 
Ethel Moore — Lynn, Massachusetts. 
Esther Morey — Clinton, Indiana. 
Nina Marsh — Pipestone, Minnesota. 
Victoria Nettel — Manchester, New Hampshire. 
Clara Parker — Goffstown, New Hampshire. 
Florence Poston — Crawfordsville, Indiana. 
Marjorie Risser — Kankakee. Illinois. 
Amalia Rosenbaum — Easton, Pennsylvania. 
Eleanor Ryan — Columbus, Ohio. 
Rosalie Seinsheimer — Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pamela Spargo — Ogrlen, Utah. 
Marion Spelger — Seattle. Washington. 
Ruth Spindler — Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
Gertrude Tinglev — Greenwood, Massachusetts. 
Mary Starr Utter — Westerly, Rhode Island. 
Edith Waller — St. Joseph, Missouri. 
Genevieve White — Oak Park, Illinois. 
Winifred Whittlesey — Middletown, Connecticut. 
Rosaltha Williams — Cochituate, Massachusetts. 



Room 

65 

5 

37 

4 

27 

Carter D 

31 

60 

48 

3 

28 

37 

15 

Clark 8 

?8 

Carter E 

Carter C 

Clark 8 

Cushman 29 



Motto — "Esse quern videri." 
Color — Green and Gold. 
Flower — Daisy. 



[ 35 ] 



THE &ILLERLEI 



:©? Sbeir 2»ee&s So ©ball HUe Iknow Zbem 

Wbo ? 
^be 3uniors!!! 

Agnes Adelsdorf: Athletic Editor, Dramatic Club, Glee Club. 

Patiently waiting in Miss Nutt's room at 9 : 30 every night. For malted 

milk, did anyone say? 
Charlotte Lesh : 

Although she burns her cake we perceive she receives 100 per cent, in her 

cooking exams. 

Emily Butterworth : 3rd Sergeant C. 

Studying to be a missionary's wife. 
Ethel Moore: 

When she isn't going home she's here. 

Grace Alexander: 2nd Sergeant A. 

Haunting the regions of the practice kitchen — above as well as below. 

May Beardsley : 

Finding a space on her ever increasing list to add the latest one. 

Elsie Fies: Dramatic Club, 1st Sergeant A. 

Ballet dancing. Known in class meeting by "I move we lay it on the table." 

Maude Dunlap: 

Ask Miss Shinn for particulars. 
Ruth Coulter : 

Demonstrating the value of rubber heels to all students. 
Rosalie Seinsheimer: 

Talking French so that even Mademoiselle can understand her. 
Pamelia Spargo : 

Warding off all affectionate admirers by the ever ready cry, "Be careful of 
my shirtwaist." 
Edith Waller: Joke Editor, Glee Club, Staff Artist, 3rd Sergeant B. 
When Edith to Lasell did come, 

She claimed she could not draw, 
But now behold ! these pictures here, 
She made without a flaw. 
But beware of hair ornaments and don't forget to wash the dishes, Edo. 

[ 36 ] 



THE &2LLERLEI 



Rosaltha Williams : 

Keeping still. 
Genevieve White : Associate Editor, Dramatic. 

Talking, especially in Room 6, Wednesday p. m. 
Winifred Whittlesey: 

Denying herself a drink of water at each meal according to Mrs. Martin's 

directions for beautifying. 
Florence Poston : Joke Editor, Glee Club, Dramatic, President of Missionary 

Society. 

Giggling, giggling, giggling. 

Elsie Holtzman : 

Demonstrating the use of hair growers. 
FIazel Bower: Staff Artist, Art Club, Dramatic Club. 

Spending her Mondays away from Lasell. 
Ruth Bachelder: 

"Busy as a bee and quiet as a mouse." 

Nina Marsh : 

"Saying little, doing much." 
Miriam Flynn : Class President, Glee Club, Dramatic Club, Captain Co. A. 

Stamping foot on floor, "Girls, will you be still!" 
Mary Goodwillie: Glee Club, Dramatic, Class Sentinel. 

'Trying to make us think she is smart because she has a "soft spot" on the 

top of her head. 
Charline Billington : 2nd Sergeant B. 

The star of the French play ! ! Although famous in center-ball no one can 

question Charline's probability of becoming the prima donna of Lasell. 

Lillian Lane: Dramatic Club. 

"Axcuse me goat. I do not know just what to say of this most attractive 
young lady." 

Clyde Bonebrake : Dramatic Club. 
Always ready for Boston. 

Florence Jones : Subscription Agent. 

Making journeys to the scales three times a day. We wonder if she is try- 
ing to get the position of fat lady in the circus next year. 

Mildred Hall: Editor-in-Chief, Yell Master, Adjutant, Secretary A. A. As- 
sociation, Editor Leaves, Student Council. 

Seen daily hurrying toward Miss Potter's room with huge bundles and 
sheets of manuscript. Did anyone say it was easy to be Editor-in-Chief 
of the Allerlei? 



[ 37 ] 



THE ALLERLEI 



Marion Spelger: Subscription Agent. 

Playing center ball is Alar ion's greatest accomplishment but she has many 

others — behold her curls! 
Ruth Spindler: 

Trying to become the rival of Mischa-Elman. 
Gertrude Tingley : Associate Editor, Glee Club, Dramatic Club. 

Singing often selections from Grand Opera, but once in a while a little 

snatch of light opera such as, "Has Anyone Here Seen Kelly?" 

Elsie Huebner: 

Getting ahead of everyone else in sewing class. We wonder why, Elsie? 
Bernice Lincoln : Glee Club. 

Playing center ball? No! not exactly that. 

Ester Morey : Assistant Business Manager. 

Shining brightly, oh ! so lightly ; one of the history stars ! 
Clara Parker: Business Manager. 

Managing affairs in such a way that, "Voila!" this Allerlei the best in the 

history of Lasell. 

Eleanor Ryan : 

'Til upside down turns this old world 

And topsy-turvey is the sea, 
Then, oh then, but not 'til then, 
Can she without her lessons be. 
Marjorie Risser: 

Assisting Miss Irwin in keeping order in that corridor. 

Amalia Rosenbaum : 

She sleeps ! my lady sleeps ! 

Advertising Agents : 

Lillian Beuhner. 

Mary Starr Utter : Vice-President, Student Council. 

Annie Merrill: Class Treasurer, President of Leaves, 1st Sergeant C. 
(Entering the office of a large department store in Boston, each coughing 
and nervously clutching the other, then gasping to the stern looking ad- 
vertising manager) : "We are about to issue the Allerlei, the year book 
of Lasell, and we would be very pleased if you would favor us with an 
advertisement." 

(Manager interrupting coldly) : "We do no advertising here." 

Hasty exit. 



[ 38 ] 



THE S^LLERLEI 



Dorothea Africa: 

Making- an appearance in the dining room balcony at 7 :40 each morning. 

Rachel Chambers : Assistant Business Manager. 

Known far and wide for her center-guarding. (But even if Rachel didn't 
have this to distinguish her, who could ever forget the fat lady in the 
circus?) 

Vivian Cooke: Glee Club. 

Thrilling her hearers at all times of day with tales of the wonderful ad- 
ventures of "Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show." 

Marion Joslin : Class Secretary, Assistant Editor, Subscription Agent of 
Leaves. 

Laughing when "Everything goes dead wrong," 'specially in Pa Hooligan's 
family. 

Ruth Graham : Glee Club, Dramatic, Social Editor. 

Entertaining callers Monday afternoon. (Ruth, I thought you had a lim- 
ited calling list!) 

Victoria Nettle : 

Easily becoming by her brilliant works the authoress of 1912. 

Ora Hammond: Subscription Agent. 

Her frequent visits to the florists make us wish to advise her to marry one 
of such a profession in order to save her money. 




[ 39 ] 



SOPHOHORC 




[ 40 ] 



THE S^LLERLEI 



Zbc Sophomore Class 



Juliette Beach, 
Elizabeth Linn, 
Elizabeth Edson, 
Marjorie Lees, 
Martorie Lees, 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Yell-Master 



Juliette Beach 
Alma Bunch 
Charlotte Breedon 
.Margaret Clark 
Mary Dill 
Elizabeth Edson 
Dorothy Frost 
Beatrice Hirsch field 
Charlotte Joseph 



Carolyn Lawton 
Marjorie Lees 
Elizabeth Linn 
Hilda MacDonald 
Mildred Otto 
Florence Shields 
Pearl Townsend 
Clara Trowbridge 
Florence Wallace 



[ 41 



No name 
and date. 



1. Entirely unnecessary. 

2. Why not use dictionary 
once in a while? 

3. Punctuation. 

4. Not clear. 



5. Meaning the Juniors of 

course. 



6. "Announced," more refined 
English. 

7. Will probably be. 



8. Wrong point of view. 



9. Why repeat Sophomores so 

many, many times. Are they 
so extremely important? 

* Superfluous adjectives in 
this paragraph. 












Title should always be underlined. 



THE HTSTORY OF THE SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



To one who is unacquainted with the annals of the various classes, it 

may seem strange that ever since they have been written, the Sophomore 

.1 to 

class has been (aimed at by) its rival classes (as) a target for all manner 

2 3 

of sport, but to one who knows the ( stuff ) the Sophomores are made of 

4 
the fact may occur that this (seeming derision is somewhat akin to a story 

about a fox and some grapes.) The youthful Freshmen hold high their 

heads with a secret joyful expectancy for the day when they shall bear the 

name of Sophomores, while their Junior sisters only attempt to ridicule 

5 

them when they find that (they) are not to be outwitted as easily as was 
expected. 

Our Sophomore class of 1913 is no exception to the rule. One of the 

first events of our joyous career was on the night we serenaded and 

6 

(yelled) our officers to the Seniors. If you ask the Juniors who first 

7 

reached the goal, their answer (may be probably,) "The Juniors!", but in 

the bottom of their hearts, they truly know, though even now they will 

8 
not admit it, that it was the ( happy Sophomores who were first heard) 

by our dear Seniors. 

In the first part of the month of October, we were one Saturday even- 

ing all entertained at a delightful chafing dish party given (the Sopho- 

* — - — 

mores ) by the Seniors at Pickard House, and surely every Sophomore 
still has a happy memory of that gay evening which our hostesses made 



[ 42 J 



10. Not needed. Do not All up [ 
space with unnecessary words. I 

11. Repetition. 



12. Tour subjects are con- 
stantly ambiguous. 



13. Good adjective. 



14. When did you And this 
out? 

15. A little more exaggeration 
and you would certainly have 
had a civil war. 

16. "Terrified," better word 
here. Look up rules for end- 
ings. 

17. Not necessary. 

IS. Written with great eclat, 
Miss X. Y. Z. 



19. "Sometime," when refer- 
ring to indefinite time. 

20. "Looking towards highest 
step." 

a Always excellent plan to 
punctuate when yon linve 
time. 



10 

so enjoyable to us. (We have already expressed to our Sister Class our 

i 1 
appreciation of their early hospitality (to the Sophomores,) and we again 

take this opportunity of thanking them. ) 

There may be left yet in the minds of some of the Juniors some slight 

recollection of an occurrence in which they were made more aware than 

12 
formerly, of the existence of the Sophomore Class. After (they ) discov- 
ered that quite a number of the costumes to be worn at their party for 
the Seniors had mysteriously disappeared, the members of the Sophomore 
class began to receive unwonted attention from the Juniors. Their every 

1 3 

movement was watched with greatest care, and the (untiring ) Juniors 

kept sentinels on guard the greater part of the night before their party. 

The Sophomores led them such a very merry dance that they felt them- 

14 
selves (obliged to guard their costumes on the room of one of the 

Faculty.) [Alas! on that eventful night the expectant Juniors, then fully 

16 

armed against further outbreaks from the (terrifying) Sophomores, must 

17 
have met with disappointment when they found themselves (left ) uti- 
le 
molested,] (but it was thought best to have compassion on them, as well 

as on the Faculty, who might become weary of offering aid. ) 

Thus far, our career as Sophomores has been a happy and a joyful 
2 keep 1 

one, (and so we intend to (make.) it, ) (as the life of all true Sophomores 

is.) We have mounted and left behind us two steps in the Ladder to 

Success; on the third we now stand with a firm tread; to the fourth we 

19 20 

hope to (soon) ascend: our eyes are (resting upon the top,) and until 

step 
that (-tap-) is reached^ we will not cease to climb. 



[ 43 




[ 44 ] 



THE S^LLERLEI 



Zhe jFresbman Class 



Dorothy Payne, 
Genevieve Bettcher, 

Genevieve Bettcher, 

Ruth Trowbridge, 

Genevieve Bettcher 
Dorothy Bragdon 
Dorothy Canfield 
Dorothy Dean 

Dora Goodwillie 



President 
Secretary 

Yell-Master 

Treasurer 

Mabel Flagler 
Dorothy Payne 
Helen Rollins 
Ruth Trowbridge 



History of 
Zhe Jresbman Class 

N spite of the vain attempts of the 
Sophomores to break up the meeting, 
the Class of 1914 was duly organized 
on Wednesday evening, September 
the twenty-sixth. Although a few 
Freshmen were detained by no doubt 
well-meaning members of 1913, enough gathered, 
under the protection of four brave Juniors, to organ- 
ize and elect officers. After some discussion, it was 
decided that the colors of this distinguished organ- 
ization should be red and white, and the emblem, red 
and white roses. The Freshmen are rather few in 
number, but they make their presence felt in a great 
many ways, and, after all, that is one of the neces- 
sities in the life of a loyal and inspiring class. 




[ 45 1 



THE &?LLERLEI 




preparatory 



Ellen Coleman 
Marian Gibbons 
Lois Hammond 
Marian Keefer 
Florence Ad aline Porter 



E. I. Le Bonte 
Florence Sundt 
Lillian Westerlund 
Ruth Whittley 
Anne Wright 



Axie Van Deusen 



[ 46 ] 




[ 47 ] 



THE S2LLERLEI 



Zbc Special Class 



Myrilla Annis, 
Florence Myers, 
Floy Johnson, 
Elizabeth Farnum, 



President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Yell-Master 



Myrilla Annis 
Dorothy Beacom 
Ella Beal 
Corinne Becker 
Marjorie Beeler 
Hilda Betts 
Helen Block 
Florence Brand 
Bessie Brown 
Helen Case 
Unice Cox 
Marjorie Davis 
Reba Denman 
Jean Dennett 
Caroline Dougherty 
Gladys Dudley 
Josephine Edgerton 
Agnes Erdman 
Genevieve Evans 
Elizabeth Farnum 
Lois Fischer 
Ruth Flanagan 
Elba Forbess 
May Gates 



MlNETTA GlLDNER 

hortense go wing 
Margaret Green 
Eleanor Hammond 
Ida Hammond 
Marguerite Harris 
Alice Hathaway 
Jean Humbird 
Katherine Humbird 
Floy Johnson 
Grace Lindsay 
Sarah Loring 
Marian MacArthur 
Esther McCrory 
Adele McDonald 
Gertrude Marks 
Ruth Maurer 
May Meloon 
Tessa May 
Sybil Morgan 
'Isabel Mullen 
Florence Myers 
Marian Nevius 
Cora Nicholson 



Marjorie Norton 
Dorothy Porter 
Isabelle Read 
Dorothy Rogers 
Ethel Rogers 
Mary Orem 
Helen Scott 
Margerie Simes 
Eva Smilie 
Nettie Roulstone 
Hazel Sanders 
Edna Smith 
Mabel Smith 
Helen Snyder 
Ruth Snyder 
Marian Stevens 
May Sundt 

Mary Louise Thompson 
Irene Vedder 
Edessa Warner 
Edna Woolson 
Mildred Wester velt 
Mildred Wright 
Sophie Wendt 



[ 48 ] 



THE ALLERLEI 




WWJ&&J3M- 





H Junior's Xine a 2Da£ 

Sept. 20. — Arrived at Auburndale ; — unchanged, except for the absence of the 

yellow house on the corner. Surprised not to see more old girls 

back — oodles of new. 
21. — Great longing for mail. Usual orchestra for dinner and dance in gym. 
22. — Classifications ! Question, to be or not be a Junior. Launch riding 

on the Charles. 
23. — Didn't hear bell, so therefore no breakfast. Class meeting and yelling 

of officers. Took two new girls walking. 
24. — All busy arranging unfixable schedules. Assignment of tables. Frolic 

in gym. 
25. — Went to the Congregational church. Wrote letters. 
26. — A serenade? Yes, but only by girls — old to new. 
27. — Memorable for a double serenade — question, who got there first, 

Juniors or Sophs? 
28. — Walked over to West Newton. Leaves meeting at which officers 

were elected. 
29. — Deaconess' Motor Fete Day. English Tea Room on campus. Great 

scramble for autos, disappointments and breakdowns. 
30. — Went over to Pickard House. Walking with one of the new girls. 

Lecture by Dr. Vincent. 

[ 49 ] 



THE &2LLERLEI 



Oct. 1. — The old girls dance to the new. 

2. — Church as usual. After vespers twelve of us went into the Rescue 

Mission. Very interesting. 
3. — Got up early and cleaned room. Couldn't go to town because "I was 

broke" — great disappointment. 
5.— Up at 5.30 to study. 

6, — Recital by Mr. Wilhelm Heinrich. "Rosa, Rosa" again made a hit 
11. — Too busy to write in my diary. H. E. test. Glee Club trials. 
12. — English test. Organ recital by Professor Dunham. 
13. — Columbus Day but no holiday for us. Lecture by Dr. Leon Vincent 

on "Robert Louis Stevenson." 
15. — The Juniors in our hall celebrated by having their Seniors stay all 
night. Great fun — great eats — little sleep. For information apply 
to Miss Warner. 
16.— "Visited" Methodist Church. Slept at Pickard. 
17. — Annual ( ?) cleaning. Tea in Brookline with an old girl. 
20. — Autoing in the school car in p. m. Lecture by Dr. Vincent on 

"Robert Burns." 
21. — Walking in p.m. Studied until 11.45. Am getting used to it now. 
22. — -Went to Fletcher's. Missionary talk by Miss Adams. "Fortune 
Hunter" in the evening. Miss Warner treated to hot chocolate when 
we returned, and oh so good. 
23. — Same as last Sunday — church and letters. 
24. — All day in town. 
26. — Studied all day— made up English. 

27. — Music periods at last established. Lecture bv Dr. Powers. 
28. — Waltham in p. m. Took dinner at the Woodland Park hotel. 
29. — Autoing all p. m» Tire blew up. Hallowe'en celebration — weird 

assembly of brooms, pumpkins, babies, and witches. 
30. — Church, vespers at 3, Congo, church in evening to hear quartette from 

Fiske University. 
31. — Cleaned all morning. Reioiced at sight of a birthday box which my 
roommate received. 
Nov. 1. — Watched practice of basket ball teams on campus. No signs of 
winter as yet. 
2. — Survived through the day so am good for another week. 
3. — Lecture on "Colors" by Mr. H. T. Bailey. We poor mortals who have 

both brown eyes and hair! What shall we wear? 
7. — Pouring dismal rain so I sewed all p. m. 

[ 50 ] 



THE &ZULERLEI 



8.— H. E. until 3 p. m. Made biscuits with fairly good success. 
9. — Taught history class for Miss Rand as she was ill. 
10. — Lecture by Harold Baines on "Our Wild Neighbors." Splendid! 
12. — Military Drill began. Class meetings at every turn. Slept at Pickard. 
13. — Congo. Church. Topic at vespers, "Watch." 
14. — Waltham in morning with room-mate. Studied English in p. m. 
15. — Helped make programmes. Reception in Brookline in p. m. 
16. — Class meetings, rehearsals, more programmes. 
17. — No lecture, thank goodness! Working incessantly on party. 
18. — Nine costumes gone but six found in a Soph's, trunk. Five of us 

worked until 12.45 on the ballet costume. 
19. — All Juniors pop-eyed. Party a success. Seniors dressed as lassies 

and we Juniors as boys in overalls. 
20. — Usual Sunday. 

21. — Went to Denison House in P.M. with Mdle. Leland Powers re- 
cited "The Prince." 
22. — Busy writing a history paper. 

23.- — Left for N. H. on the 11.32. Thanksgiving vacation. 
28. — Reached Auburn dale in P. M. Hard to buckle down to work again 
after such a nice vacation. 
Dec. 1. — H. T. Bailey lectured on "Beauty of Form in Common Things." 

2. — Finished my Xmas shopping. German Play by the Senior German 

Class. 
3. — Room-mate gone to Worcester for week-end. Terribly lonesome. 
4. — Senorita Marcella spoke at Vespers. 
5. — Called in Brookline. Leaves out once more. 
7. — In practice kitchen in capacity of dinner cook. Have cut my finger 

already. Christmas Concert. 
8. — Burnt my fingers. Nearly bunged up from H. E. Went to bed 

instead of to lecture by Dr. Powers. 
9. — Rehearsal of Mother Goose Play. Everyone weighed in the gym. 
10. — Sewed and packed. Mending up things before going home. 
11. — Christmas Vespers by Glee Club. 
12. — Xmas celebration in dining-room at dinner. Mother Goose Play 

in evening. 
13. — Bought my ticket for home and packed. 

14. — -Left on the popular 2 o'clock Lake Shore. No place like home 
when it comes to Christinas vacation. 
Jan. 5. — Reached Auburndale at 1 A. M. No luncheons after midnight so 
after registering we retired. 



[ 51 ] 



THE ALLERLEI 



6. — Got up at 10 o'clock. Am at Miss Rand's table this term. 
7. — Annual auction of those valuable magazines. Walking in the after- 
noon. 
8. — First attempt of the year at getting up for Sunday breakfast. 

Orange marmalade ! ! ! 
9. — Nearly gave up the Allerlei in Class meeting. "While there's life. 

there's hope." 
10. — Practice kitchen once more — pastry cook this week. 
11. — Seniors came to dinner with their Class pins. Big scare among 

Juniors. New president led C. E. meeting. 
12. — Mrs. Martin gave, "If I were King." White gown and red roses. 

Reproduction in Carter Hall afterwards. 
13. — Allerlei voting contest in afternoon. Counted votes until 9:30. 
14._Saw David Warfield in "The Return of Peter Grimm." Tears! 

Tears ! 
15. — Breakfast in practice kitchen. Church. Dr. Clark preached the 

sermon. Room-mate ill. 
18. — Regular Junior Class meeting!!!! 
19. — Lecture on Paul L. Dunbar by Mr. Pearson. Wonderful! Mrs. 

Martin was lost in admiration. 
23. — Juniors received invitations from Seniors for Feb. 4th. Great curi- 
osity aroused. 
24. — Seniors came to breakfast in caps and gowns. We wonder why 

they didn't do it at night. 
26. — We Juniors decorated a table for the Seniors. Seniors in prac- 

tice kitchen, some worried. 
27. — Student council began. I am on the scrub team. 
28. — Specials went on hay-ride, Sophs had fudge party, Seniors had a 

spread, we Juniors do nothing but work. 
29.— Church. Wrote letters all P. M. Vespers, "The Fruits of the 

Spirit." 
30. — Wrote up this diary so was kept rather busy. 
31. — Sick with the grippe, so not much doing. 
Feb. 4. — Dressed for Senior party. Flowers from my Senior, just dear. 
Dandy time at the party. Concert fine. 
5. — Church and letters once more. 
6. — Went over to Waltham in the afternoon. 

7. — Fierce snow-storm. Prayer meeting with my Senior. Sent to 
study hall for not keeping practice periods. 



[ 52 ] 



THE ALLERLEI 



8. — Practiced overtime. More snow — good outlook for White Mt. trip. 
9. — Worked all morning. Made up practice period. Packed in the 
evening. 

10. — Up beastly early. Party of 38 with Miss Warner as chaperone left 
Auburndale at 7 : 39 for Interdale. 

13. — Nearly dead — so stiff and lame from snow shoeing, tobogganing and 
skiing. I could hardly wiggle — too tired to study. 

14. — Valentine's day. Tables looked real nice. Flowers from my room- 
mate. 

15. — Studied English, then flunked a test. Trigonometry began. Washed 
my hair. 

16. — Studied and practiced. Riding in the school sleigh. Lecture on "Pho- 
tography" by Mr. Henry T. Bailey. 

18. — Specials beat us in a game of centre-ball. Fudge party. 

19. — Two women spoke at church — Increase of Negroes. 

20. — Went to Brookline for luncheon. Bought a new lavender kimono. 
Made up "White Mt. English." 

21. — Made up another English lesson. Allerlei pictures taken. Why so 
many peter thompson's ? 

22. — Washington's birthday. Worked all morning. Dressed in grand- 
mother's black silk dress. All the girls looked dear. Orchestra and 
dance. 

23. — A party went to see Isadore Duncan. Couldn't afford so much fri- 
volity this month. 

25. — Juniors beat Specials in Center Ball. Great excitement. 

26. — Day of Prayer. Camp Fire in gym. 
March 1. — Allowance came — Oh joy! Orphean Concert. 



[ 53 ] 



THE &?LLERLEI 



In tbe Make of tbe Clown 




HE big lot lies dark and barren, veiled in the grey mists and 
silence of the early morning. The eastern sky grows gradually 
lighter ; the sun rises slowly, large and red, betokening a 
long, hot day. Suddenly the silence is broken by the sound 
of horses' hoois and creaking of wheels, and a large, bright 
red wagon lumbers over the top of the hill. It is followed by 
others, yellow, blue and white, all making a brilliant procession. Hurrah! The 
Circus is here once more ! 

Within the hour that follows the lot is transformed from a peaceful spot 
into a centre of chaotic hubbub. Tbe air resounds with the hoarse shouts of 
men, the shrill cries of the excited and energetic youngsters, the thud of the 
sledge-hammers, the stamping of horses, the rumble of heavy wagons, the 
clatter of dishes, and the roars of the strange wild animals of the menagerie. A 
delightful, elusive odor, "the smell of the saw-dust," is in the air ; and as if by 
magic, a miniature city of white tents has risen from the earth. 

By now the performers are upon the scene and the dressing room tents are 
subjects of curiositv to the inquisitive crowds. A tall, handsome young fel 1 ow 
elbows his way to the door of the tent, disappears within it and hurries to the 
mail box. A look of disappointment crosses his face ; he frowns with anxiety, 
for no letter awaits him. "Surely mother can't be ill," he says to himself, trying 
bravely to fight down the unpleasant thoughts that rush to his mind. However, 
he cannot linger ; it is late, and he hurries away to dress for the performance. 

The band strikes up a gay medley and Slivers, the famous clown, emerges 
from the dressing room, a ludicrous figure in his fool's costume. As he crosses 
to the big top, he is pointed out to a messenger boy who overtakes him and 
delivers a telegram. Hurriedly tearing open the ominous yellow missive he 
reads : 

Frank Oakley 

Your mother died this a. m. Wire funeral expenses. 

Dr. Hartless. 

Reeling as if struck by an unseen hand, the clown turns back to the dressing 
room, but hearing his name called in the harsh tones of the ring-master, he 
steadies himself and again starts for the arena. A shout of delighted laughter 
rises at his entrance, and with the painted face and leering red mouth concealing 

[ 54 ] 



THE &FLLERLEI 



the pain-drawn face beneath, he amuses those thousands of pleasure seekers with 
his meaning-less antics. 

The performance is over, and after the early supper, the inhabitants of this 
restless little world enjoy a brief respite from their strenuous efforts to entertain 
the fickle public. As dusk falls, one by one the tents burst forth into a blaze of 
light. Torches gleam here and there and everywhere. Already the cook tent 
has been torn down and packed away in the great wagons, which have again 
begun their rambling journey. A breath of surprise sweeps over you as you 
leave the big top, for gone are the many tents. The huge ghost-like canvas is 
soon empty and comes crashing to the earth. In the twinkling of the eye it too 
is packed away, and once more Night comes into her own. The great field lies 
vacant, wrapped in the star-lit silence, and in the distance flickers the tiny, red 
lantern of the last fast-disappearing wagon. 

Vivian Kittie Cooke. 



H Sab Uale 




iNCE there was a famous "Knight," "Kelly" by name, who went 
out to seek his fortune. He traveled long and wearily and at 
length came to the court of a renowned king. This court was 
called "Martincourt" and many battles waged here. At "Mar- 
tincourt" the "Knight" was sadly defeated and met his "Dumn." 
He did not like the idea of fighting so many battles and decided 
to become a "Mayer" because he could "Bos (the job) well." 

One morning he walked across the "Lee" to the grocery store, and seeing 
some butter he asked the groceryman, "How much is 'Butterworth,' and what is 
the name of the 'Brand-oh' ?". The grocery man only coughed and said 
"Nin(a)." Hearing this, the good "Knight" cried out, " 'Kauffman,' cough, 
'Or(d)way' it, else I will hit your 'Shinn.' Dont 'Sayre' don't know." The 
groceryman only said, "Just you give me a moment's 'Grace.' ' Just then the 
groceryman saw something terrible and cried out, "My wife! I must 'Warner'!" 
"Haley's" comet summoning up all its "Powers" shot down upon them, thus 
both perished. 



[ 55 ] 







[ 56 J 



THE &2LLERLEI 




M 

o 

w 

H 
_) 
O 

w 
< 



[ 57 ] 



THE StfLLERLEI 



(Hee Club 



Marion Shinn, 
Mary Goodwillie, 
Miriam Flynn, 
Doris Powers, 
Edith Waller, 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Businesss Manager 



Miss Helen Goodrich, Directress 

Miriam Flynn, Assistant Directress 
Marion Ordway, Accompanist 



1st Soprano 
Miriam Flynn 
Vivian Cooke 
Edith Waller 
Ruth Graham 
Helen Scott 

1st Alto 

Doris Powers 
Florence Myers 
Florence Poston 
Mary Goodwillie 
Virginia Lee 
Gertrude Tingley 



2nd Soprano 
Marion Shinn 
Ida Hammond 
Eleanor Hammond 
Genevieve Bettcher 
Bernice Lincoln 
Agnes Adelsdorf 

2nd Alto 
Vera Bradley 
Genevieve Evans 
Edessa Warner 
Alma Bunch 
Lois Hammond 



[ 58 ] 



THE StLLERLEI 



Gbe Xasell (Slee Club 




HE Glee Club consists of twenty-one girls, who have been 
chosen from those who tried for the Club at the beginning of the 
year. This trial was before Miss Goodrich, the Director, and 
the old Glee Club girls, the candidates having to be approved 
by both. Work begins with an hour's practice twice a week, 
but when concert time draws near, rehearsals come often. 
Each member is entitled to a pin which is very attractive, being a small gold 
clef with "L. G. C." raised on one side. The first public appearance of the 
Club is at Christmas Vespers, when they assist in the service held in the gym- 
nasium by giving several appropriate selections. The Spring Concert is the 
great social event of the school year and usually takes place the last of May. 
All welcome this day with great enthusiasm, and many invite friends to see 
and hear Lasell at its best. We are looking forward to the concert this year 
with much pleasure, for with the splendid work that the Glee Club is doing 
it cannot fail to be successful. 



Zhe ©rpbean Club 



XE of the most interesting and instructive societies in school 
is the Orphean Club, which is composed of about fifty of our 
singers. They have weekly rehearsals conducted by Professor 
Henry M. Dunham, under whose competent training two con- 
certs are given each year. Xot only is it enjoyable to meet 
for these musical afternoons, but the members learn much 
about music, and receive valuable help for future chorus-singing. 

This year, the cantatas, "The Song of the Norns," and "The Fisher-Maid- 
ens", were finely rendered by the Club, and were greatly enjoyed by the school 
and its friends. 




[ 59 1 



THE &ZLLERLEI 




PQ 

& 
J 
O 

o 

I— I 

Q 



[ 60 ] 




MMIICS 



Elizabeth Brandow, 
Gladys Lawton, 
Helen Sayre, 
Vera Bradley, 
Nina Dietz, 
Genevieve White, 
Mary Goodwillie, 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Co stumer 
Stage Manager 



Assistant Stage Manager 



Clyde Bonebrake 
Hazel Bower 
Vera Bradley 
Elizabeth Brandow 
Dorothy Canfield 
Nina Dietz 
Alma Dumn 
Elsie Fies 
Lois Fischer 
Mary Goodwillie 
Ruth Graham 
Marguerite Harris 
Gladys Lawton 
Margery Lees 
Elizabeth Linn 

Genevieve White 



Marian MacArthur 
Edna MacDonald 
Florence Myers 
Marian Nevius 
Dorothy Porter 
Florence Porter 
Florence Poston 
Helen Sayre 
Helen Scott 
Margerie Simes 
Marion Shinn 
Gertrude Tingley 
Clara Trowbridge 
Florence Wallace 
Mildred Wester velt 



[ 61 ] 



THE &SLLERLEI 



Zhc Dramatic Club 




^RIGINALLY the Dramatic Club was formed for the purpose 
of cultivating" the histrionic ability among Mrs. Martin's pri- 
vate pupils. It soon was decided to allow any member of the 
school "to try for the club." Shortly after school opens in 
September the old Dramatic Club girls meet to hear the new 
aspirants recite, some candidates being accepted at once, while 
others are given a second trial. It is thought desirable to keep the number 
of members between thirty and forty, and the new members are chosen with a 
view to their fitness for certain plays to be given later on in the year. The 
badge of the Club is a gold pin the form of a masque with a pearl in the 
mouth. 

Until this year two plays have been given, one light, short and usually 
modern, the other a more formal and classic presentation. To the latter, guests 
of the school are invited. 



fllMsstonat:^ Society 



' 1 i*5$W™^u 


T 







HE Lasell Missionary Society was founded about 1887, and 
has become quite flourishing. It raises yearly, by means of 
individual pledges and a lawn festival, three hundred and fifty 
dollars, in round numbers, which sum is divided among a num- 
ber of home and foreign missions. The students, with the 
help of the teachers, decide where this money shall go. It is 
customary to send twenty dollars each year to a little day school in Moradabad, 
India. This pays all expenses of the school, including the teacher's salary. We also 
always help from one to three girls in Harpoot, Turkey, and a little girl in India 
who takes our name, Lasell. We have supported two such girls, Julia Lasell 
and Caroline Lasell, until their marriage, and we now have another Caroline. 
Besides these, funds are usually sent to the Euphrates College, to the Floating 
Hospital in Boston, the Deaconesses' Fresh Air Fund, Claflin University, the 
Frances E. Willard Settlement in Boston, the International Institute for Girls 
in Spain, Mrs. ChappeH's work in Japan, and many other institutions. Every 
third Sunday each month, representatives of some missionary field talk to us at 
vespers. These talks have aroused so much interest among us that we look 
forward to one of the best years for the Society. 



[ 62 ] 



THE &2LLERLEI 




Zhc Suffragette Society 




ages 



WO minutes to nine" — doors are opened, and suppressed 
laughter and talking is audible all along the corridor. Heads 
are slipped out, and then as quickly and silently taken in again. 
Finally the peals of the bell, which has so many pleasant and 
unpleasant meanings to all, bring, in a fraction of a second, to 
the once quiet hall a throng of the strangest looking person- 
One thought oneself to be in a civilized girls' school, but the sight that 
greets one's eyes at this time would rather indicate one to be enclosed between 
walls of a lunatic asylum ! The company forms in couples and headed by a 
weird banner bearer, wends its way to the gymnasium, to the tune of "March- 
ing Through Georgia." The Suffragettes, for such they are, sing their praises 
and extol their cause. Fiery speeches and hot debates entertain the onlookers, 
who by the way, number nearly a hundred (?), for twenty minutes. Then 
with uniformity unexcelled by orders of the opposite sex, the body adjourns. 
The influence which this small company has exerted is far-reaching, and stands 
as an ideal example to all Suffragettes. 



[ 63 ] 





Btbletics 



Oh, be sure we shall all think of gym, 
When old age has made youthful eyes dim ; 
We'll remember the days 
Which have filled us with grace, 
And have made us good looking and slim. 

The worst thing of all is the horse! 
This we hit on the top with great force 

When we spring, and we land 

Now and then on a hand. 
With a groan. So we like it, of course. 

'Tis the games that we love best of all, 
Tho' at times we have many a fall. 

"Three deep" is such fun. 

How we laugh ! How we run ! 
And I musn't leave out basket-ball. 

In the midst of the winter so gay, 
When the ice has come hither to stay, 

On the river we skate — ■ 

Girls, isn't it great ! 
How we do hate the close of the day ! 





THE &FLLERLEI 



But in springtime when Nature's so bright, 
When the pleasures of May are in sight, 

We know it is true 

That 'tis time to canoe, 
And where there's a boat there's delight. 

Of course there is this dreadful pest, 

One must pass the much hated "strength test," 

But when that is done, 

And the crew you are on, 
Just consider that you are twice blest. 

Remember the day of the race ? 
You feel that 'tis you sets the pace. 

You are bending down low 

When Miss Warner savs "Go !" 
And your crew comes in first by an ace. 

So come one and come all, with vour cry 
"We'll be loyal forever, and high 

Shall our standard be raised, 

And our energy praised, 
And we'll go you one better some dav." 

Agnes Adelsdorf, 1912. 



[ 65 ] 



THE StfLLERLEI 




Zhe Xasell Htblettc Bssoclation 

[N association of which Lasell is justly proud, is the Lasell 
Athletic Association. It was organized in nineteen hundred 
and six, and its purpose is to encourage the girls in the various 
sports, such as Tennis, Basket Ball, Swimming, Canoeing, and 
in the spring, Track Work. These different Athletics tend to 
make a girl more graceful of movement and what is more im- 
portant, to relieve her mind of work, and give her the exercise which is neces- 
sary to good, hard study. 

In order to take part in the Tennis Tournaments which occur during the 
year, or to be a member of the Crew, one must belong to the Association. Of 
all the sports, the Canoe Race is one of the most exciting of the year. Last year 
there were two crews, and the close race between them, lasting four minutes 
and forty-five seconds, was highly exciting. How hard the crews do work! 
And how happy are the girls who win the race, and smilingly receive their "L" 

sweaters. 

In the spring, the track affords great enjoyment, but last year, for some 
reason, it was dispensed with. We hope, however, that this year we shall 
be allowed to have a good field, and if we are, we may look forward to some 
exciting high jumps and relays. The winners in events of Field Day are each 
presented with a beautiful white sweater with her class numerals, or horizontal 
bars in case this is a second victory. 

The Association is very satisfactory this year, with Edna MacDonald as 

President, and Mildred Hall as Secretary. May Lasell always be proud of 

her Athletics ! 

Agnes P. x\delsdorf. 



[ 66 ] 






Hasell 
Heaves 

President 

Annie Merrill, '12 

Secretary 

Vera Bradley, '11 

Editor-in-Chief 
Helen Sayre, '11 

Associate Editors 

Gladys Lawton, '11 
Mildred Hall, '12 

Local Editor 

Ruth Butterworth, '11 



Exchange Editor 



Helen Thirkield, '11 

Business Manager 
Kathleen Knight, '11 

Subscription Agent 
Marion Joslin, '12 



[ 67 ] 





/% 





THE &FLLERLEI 




Major, Edna MacDonald 
Adjutant, Mildred Hall 
Captain Co. A., Miriam Flynn 
Captain Co. B., Elizabeth Brandow 
Captain Co. C, Gladys Lawton 



[ 68 ] 



THE StfLLERLEI 




H 

o 
o 

00 



O 



O 

i— i 



[ 69 ] 



THE &FLLERLEI 




A NATURE STUDY 



Hazel Bower 
Alma Dumn 
Ruth Flanagan 
Jean Humbied 
Gladys Lawton 
Virginia Lee 
Ethel Marks 
Esther McCrory 
May Meloon 
Marian Nevius 
Mart or ie Read 
Mary Louise Thompson 
Ruth Trowbridge 
Eleanor Warner 



Sigma Sigma Society 




' | A HE Sigma Sigma Society exists for the benefit of the art stu- 
dents. There are at present about twelve girls belonging, most 
of them having joined this year under circumstances which 
secured their everlasting loyalty and love for the society, if 
it be true that we love a thing in the same proportion as we 
suffer for it. 

The object of the society is not only to obtain the best possible work from 
the members, but also to promote their interest and enjoyment in it. There is 
a comradeship among the girls which incites them to give their best and most 
careful attention to the subjects in hand, and lends a pleasant rivalry to their 
work. 

The work of the studio is broken now and then by trips into various Art 
Exhibits in Boston, and these exhibits, explained as they are by Miss Mulliken, 
the teacher, are great incentives for work. Besides these trips, in the Spring, 
there is usually a week-end spent in some little village or at the shore. This 
is anticipated for weeks beforehand and afterward looked back upon with noth- 
ing but pleasure Taken altogether it is a Society which Lasell could not well 
get on without. 



[ 70 ] 



THE &FLLERLEI 




Christian Enbeavor 



HE Christian Endeavor Society of Lasell was organized in 1889 
by Dr. Francis E. Clark, the father of this world-wide movement, 
and has always been under his loving guidance and care. We 
are especially favored in this way, for his home is in Auburn- 
dale, but a short walk from the school, thus tending to make 
us even the more interested in this great leader and his work. 
Our meetings have been exceptionally well attended this year and have always 
proved very helpful to the girls. They are usually led by the students, but 
occasionally by some well-known Christian Endeavorer from Boston or abroad. 



§§li 


T 


IP 


p 



71 ] 



THE SfLLERLEI 



H, B, C'8 of Xasell 



Accomplished 

Flynn 

Annis 
Adventuresome 

Myers 

GOWING 

Affectionate 

Lane 

Utter 
Artistic 

Lawton, G. 

Nevius 
/ ngelic 

Ordway 

Butterworth, E. 
P ristocratic 

POSTER, D. 

Sayre 
£ ttractive 

Lane 

Brandow 
Ambitious 

Flynn 

Bachelder 
Beautiful 

Brandow 

MacDonald, H. 
Best liked 

Lawton, G. 

Brandow 
Best dressed 

Clark 

Block 
Best singers 

Flynn 

Shinn 



Best musicians 

MacDonald, E. 

Annis 
Boastful 

Hathaway 

Dean 
Boisterous 

Egerton 

Beacom 
Best students 

Edson 

Sayre 
Conspicuous 

Clark 

Westervelt 
Clever 

Myers 

goodwillte 
Cutest 

Utter 

Dietz 
Comical 

Myers 

Shinn 
Cheerful 

Joslin 

Egerton 
Careless 

Scott 

Nevius 
Congenial 

Brandow 

Lawton, G. 



[ 72 ] 



THE &2LLERLEI 




Ht tbe Sign of tbe Stoma fl>si 

*HE big dining room of the Alpha Chapter of the Sigma Psi 
iraternity was a scene of noisy festivity. The long "T" shaped 
table was resplendent with snowy linen and gleaming silver and 
giass. A huge mound of daltodiis arranged in the shape of the 
Iraternity pin tormed the centre-piece oi the table. Garlands 
ot deep green leaves and golden liowers decorated the walls of 
the room and behind a bank of hot-house greenery, an orchestra played the 
popular music of the day to the accompaniment of clicking glass ana the Jingle 
ot silver upon china. 

This was the annual dinner which was given to the new members, a chosen 
few from the Freshman Class of Wolderness College. The Sigma Psi fraternity 
was one of the oldest fraternities in the country, and to be invited to join it was 
no small honor. Its code was simple but honest, and more than one college man 
who had wished to join it had been found wanting. Perhaps some petty weak- 
ness or dishonesty of character had cropped out during his college course, which 
had not been overcome, and so he was quietly and decisively turned down. 

Gathered around the table were men both young and old. Only one chair 
was vacant. The president of the fraternity, a white-haired man sat at the head 
of the table, and on either side of him were other high officers. It was easy to 
distinguish the older members with their cool and collected manner from the 
nervous boyish newcomers. As the dinner progressed, however, everyone was 
put at his ease. Reminiscences and stories were in order and laughter grew 
more and more frequent. Finally the president arose and motioned for silence. 
Looking in the direction of the new members he said quietly: "Boys, tonight we 
have with us seven newcomers ; may they be welcome and prove a benefit to the 
fraternity. Always be upright and straightforward. Don't make friendships in 
the dark. Know your man and if he is to be your friend, stick to him and be 
his friend. There is only one of our members absent and that is Gordon. Most 
of you know him. For three years he was president of this chapter and proved 
himself to be one of the finest men in the fraternity. From several reliant sources 
I have heard he has recently met with adversity. Perhaps that explains 
his absence. Thank you for your attention, boys, and always remember the prin- 
ciples of the Sigma Psi." He bowed slightly and sat down. 

After the applause had subsided an uncomfortable silence settled down upon 
the company. Most of the men did know Gordon, but he was by no means 
popular. Indeed a few of the Sigma Psi men wondered how he had ever be- 
come a member of the fraternity. Gordon had entered Wolderness eight years 

[ 73 ] 



THE S£LLERLEI 



before and had made a record in his studies and in athletics. He was a big man 
with a pride which almost bordered on insolence. Something about him sug- 
gested the far South, manifest in the dark, growing skin, the broad, soft toned 
voice and the lithe, sinewy body. Always impassive and indifferent, the other 
men often found it hard to read the thoughts hovering behind his quiet grey 
eyes. He was always quick to overlook a fault in others, but quicker to avenge 
an insult. 'those fortunate iew who understood him were proud to Know him and 
tried to De like him, and the president of the Sigma Psi fraternity knew the real 
man. He admired Gordon's tenacity of pup-rose and resoluteness of will and 
had been glad to welcome him into the fraternity. 

The toast-master arose and broke the silence, "I call upon Mr. Lorimer for 
a toast." Lorimer flushed and a bit confused arose. "Here's to the new mem- 
bers; may they always be proud to be Sigma Psi men and good American 
citizens." Other toasts were given and drunk, and Billy Wentworth, the new 
president of the Alpha Chapter, listened with delighted satisfaction. Ever since 
he could remember he had longed to be a Sigma Psi man as his father had been 
before him. Half shyly he glanced down on the tiny patch of gold shining 
against the black of his coat. He was aroused by the sound of his name; they 
were drinking a toast to him, for he was to start on a long journey West in the 
morning, where he was the owner of the recently purchased Crescent Star ranch. 
Surprised and embarrassed, he managed to make a suitable reply. Yes, he would 
prove worthy of this new honor, he would make good in his new enterprise 

in the West. 

For the last toast the president of the fraternity was called upon. Slowly 
he glanced from each radiant face as though to read their innermost thoughts. 
"Here's to all the members, present and absent, and always remember, boys, 
we're all brothers as long as we wear the Sigma Psi pin." The toast was drunk 
and with flushed cheeks and shining eyes the men sang "Auld Lang Syne." 

***** 

It was six months later and the summer ushered in a season of intense heat 
and drought. Each morning the great bronze disk of the sun rose from the 
East and made its way slowly across the cloudless path of the sky. Rain had 
not fallen for weeks, and more than one helpless ranchman had seen his cattle 
die off in numbers for want of water. 

About four miles west of the Crescent Star ranch-house, a tiny cabin stood 
alone, away from all the big ranch houses, like a maverick which has strayed 

from the herd. 

One evening late in the summer a man might have been seen standing in 
the doorway of this cabin. He was leaning carelessly against the sill, his hands 

[ 74 ] 



THE &FLLERLEI 



thrust deep in his pockets and his broad-brimmed felt hat pulled low over his 
eyes. Something in the attitude of the man suggested dejection mingled with 
sullen indifference. He w T as aroused from his contemplation of the tiny spirals 
of smoke, scarcely perceptible in the distance, arising from the chimneys of 
Wentworth's house, by a voice, babyish and wonderfully sweet. 

"Daddy." 

Gordon turned and crossed the room to the bunk. On it lay a little chap, 
scarcely four years old, with big blue eyes and a mass of tumbled curls. So 
exquisite was the child's face, with its long fringed eyelids, its short straight 
nose and soft red lips, that it might have been a face on a rare old cameo. 

"Well, son," Gordon sat down on the edge of the bed and smoothed the curls 
from the white forehead, "how's the pain tonight?" 

The child smiled bravely, then winced. It's awful tonight, daddy, but I'll 
try to sing myself to sleep. I'm so dry inside, daddy, I think I'll burn up. If I 
could only have a drink, just a wee one, my froat is so dry." 

Gordon rose, and taking a cracked cup from the table poured some water 
into it. It was the last they had and he was wretchedly thirsty himself, but Ted 
should have it. He brought it back to the bed and held it to the child's lips. 
With a suppressed groan of pain the little fellow raised himself on his elbow 
and drank greedily. As Gordon watched him, his heart sank within him. He 
could fool himself no longer, Ted was steadily growing worse. The hands that 
held the cup were daily becoming thinner and more transparent and the little 
body was growing frailer and frailer. The man despised himself for his utter 
help 1 essness. If Betty had only lived — but with a muttered sob he dashed the 
hot tears from his eyes and almost savagely snatched the cup from Ted's lips. 
When he returned to the bed again he was all tenderness and love. 

"Teddy," he said after a while, "I think we'll have to leave this part of the 
country and seek our fortunes elsewhere." 

"But, daddy," the blue eyes grew troubled, "where can we go?" 

"Anywhere," roughly, "only I want you to get strong again. You must get 
well, son. Why, if daddy lost you he'd go wild." 

Ted smiled happily. "Oh ! I'll get well soon, daddy, cause I'm going to 
grow up to be a big man like you are. How can we go, daddy, you have no 
horse?" 

For a moment Gordon hesitated. It was only too true, he had no horse. 
He had been obliged to sell Pinto, a superb broncho, rather than let her die of 
thirst. Of late, things had gone hard with Jack Gordon. A year ago. his wife, 
a pretty little Eastern society girl, had died, leaving him the care of their baby. 
For awhile Gordon had been too dazed with grief and despair to realize his 



[ 75 ] 



THE &2LLERLEI 



responsibility. Soon after his wife's death, the Eastern bank in which all his 
money had been invested, had failed, leaving him absolutely penniless. One 
night his son's sobbing touched his heart strings and awakened him to his sense 
of duty. The next day he went to work. Up to a month ago he had been fore- 
man of the Comet ranch. One day because he refused to do something which 
he had considered wrong, he had lost his position. Since then he and Ted had 
taken up their abode in the little cabin. Soon Ted began to complain of a pain 
in his side. Gordon had called in a doctor who had put the child to bed and 
given him a tonic. He frankly confessed he did not understand the child's case, 
but Gordon did. He knew the child was thirsting to death. Often in the night 
Ted would whimper for his mother, and Gordon, hearing, would painfully stifle 
that same cry in his own heart. 

As he sat talking to the boy, a thought scarcely taken shape entered his 
brain. Through a dream he heard the baby say haltingly, "You wouldn't steal 
a horse, would you, daddy?" 

Gordon recovered himself with a start and replied, "Of course I wouldn't, 
son. Now suppose you try to go to sleep." 

Obediently the little fellow raised his lips for the usual kiss and then shut 
his eyes. The man softly made his way to the door and seated himself on the 
step. Not a breath of air seemed to be stirring and the moon shone down from 
a cloudless sky. Gordon fanned himself with his hat and pushed the short, 
close-cropped hair from his forehead. Oh ! if he could only decide what to do. 
There was but one way to save Ted's life, and that was to reach the mountains, 
where the fresh air and plenty of water might bring back his strength. He 
himself was young, yet scarcely twenty-eight, and though life held nothing more 
than Ted for him, he would work and educate his son. Perhaps he could send 
him to Wolderness, and who knew but Ted might yet become a Sigma Psi man. 
In that instant Gordon became again the college man and lived over his school 
days. He shook himself and arose to his feet, replacing his hat. If he only 
hadn't sold Pinto, Pinto who could run like the wind. Still, he could have the 
horse if he wished to. Wentworth kept her with the other horses in the corral — 
and it would be an easy thing to take her, but no! Gordon had yet to steal 
anything from any man, how could he have thought of such a thing? He, Jack 
Gordon, a Sigma Psi man who was afraid to look no man in the eyes. Then a 
face came before him in the moonlight, a girl's sweet face with eyes like Ted's 
and he seemed to hear a voice say faintly, "I know you'll take good care of Ted, 
Jack." Was it good care to let him die? Gordon set his lips grimly and re- 
entered the house. The even breathing of Ted told him the child was asleep. 
Securing his gun and a stout rope, he went out into the night. 



[ 76 ] 



THE S^LLERLEI 



When he reached the corral, night was almost gone and heavy grey clouds 
obscured the moonlight. Silently he made his way to Pinto, who stood at one 
side browsing on the occasional tufts of grass. At his approach, instead of 
running away, she neighed softly and waited. Gordon threw his arm about her 
neck and buried his face in her thick, glossy mane. Something within him seemed 
to give way. He couldn't steal his own horse. What if Betty looking down on 
him from among the stars should see him and be ashamed? And Ted, Ted with 
his worshipful eyes and utmost confidence, "You wouldn't steal a horse, would 
you, daddy?" 

Just as Gordon was about to steal away, he felt himself jerked roughly 
backwards. "Come along," said a grim voice close to his ear, "We'll put you 
where you can't steal horses." 

With a burly cow-puncher on each side of him, Gordon knew it was useless 
to resist. As they were nearing the house, he heard some one say, "Bring him 
right into the library, boys." 

Unceremoniously they dragged their prisoner up to the veranda and then 
through the low open window. When they released him, the light blinded his 
eyes and he flung his arm upward to protect them. Wentworth standing by 
the table, mistook the gesture. 

Oh! you needn't be afraid of any violence from us," he said insolently, "the 
law deals with horse- thieves." Gordon drew back into the shadows. He was 
glad his hat shadowed his face; he did not care to be recognized. 

"I am not afraid," he said coldly. Wentworth laughed grimly. 

"That's what they all say. I've been losing horses for the past six weeks, 
and now I know where to lay the blame. Jones," turning to one of his men, 
"Suppose you go for the sheriff; I'll hold the prisoner." 

"Martin went as soon as we were sure of him," replied the man, nodding in 
Gordon's direction. The prisoner maintained a proud silence, and to see the 
cool, indifferent look on his rather handsome face, one could never guess the 
painful thoughts which flashed through his brain. Poor little Ted, what would 
become of him? There would be no one to respond to his cheerful "Morning, 
daddy" or to hold him and soothe him when his pain grew unbearable. It 
seemed incredible to Gordon that life could be so harsh. He would make one 
desperate plea: — 

"Wentworth, I wasn't stealing — ," but the words refused to come; he could 
not beg from any man. As for Wentworth, he remained silent, furtively scanning 
his captive. Who could he be? He did not look like the ordinary cow puncher. 
Something about the ease and grace of his bearing suggested culture and refine- 
ment. Wentworth's speculations were cut short by the arrival of the sheriff. As 



[ 77 ] 



THE &ZLLERLEI 



he stalked into the room, Gordon sized him up with brooding eyes. He'd make 
one last effort for freedom. With a bound he sprang past the sheriff and out 
of the door, into the arms of two of the sheriff's men. Desperately he tried to 
free himself but they were too much for him, and struggling and resisting, they 
dragged him back. In the scuffle with the sheriff that followed, Wentworth's 
eyes caught the glint of a diamond-shaped patch of gold on Gordon's shirt. He 
recognized it only too well. It was the Sigma Psi pin. Fascinated, he continued 
to look at it, then his eyes searched the face of the horse thief. During the 
struggle Gordon's hat had been knocked off and a tiny scar, triangular and livid, 
showed plainly just above his left temple. It was such a scar as might have been 
made by a spiked shoe. Wentworth's eyes saw this scar, then he glanced down 
again at the pin. Disconnected phrases passed through his brain. "Gordon has 
met with adversity" and "we're all brothers as long as we wear the Sigma Psi 
pin." 

"Wait a minute," he said to the sheriff, who was preparing to leave, "I'd 
like to speak to the prisoner." Then he turned to Jack, "I saw your pin, and 
pardon the curiosity, but where did you get it?" 

Gordon was about to reply insolently when he saw the pin on Wentworth's 
coat ; instead he flushed darkly and turned away his head. 

"I am a Sigma Psi man." 

"Oh!" sarcastically, "then you've forgotten what it stands for?" 

"No," Gordon swung round, "I haven't forgotten." Then, sullenly, "Why 
are you keeping me?'" 

"Because I think it may be possible for you to explain your questionable 
position." 

"I have no explanation to make." 

"Boys," Wentworth turned to the sheriff and his men, "go outside on the 
veranda and you will find some refreshment. If I need you, I'll call you." 

"Well," he demanded as he and Gordon were alone, "perhaps now you can 
explain." 

Gordon wiped the blood from his wrist before replying. "I suppose yon 
can guess who I am?" 

Wentworth's lips formed the question which was also visible in his eyes, 
"You are Gordon?" 

"Yes, Jack Gordon, Wolderness '04, and once president of the Alpha Chap- 
ter of the Sigma Psi. I'm afraid I was never very popular with the boys. I 
guess it was due to my pride, which has cost me a lot, not only in school but out 
here in the West, but," with a careless shrug of his shoulders, "I can't help it, it 
is in my blood. My life in the West hasn't been all sunshine, the way yours has, 
Wentworth." 

[ 78 ] 



THE &2LLERLEI 



"That's no excuse for horse-stealing." 

"Go ahead, rub it in, I deserve it, but if you knew what tempted me you'd 
be reasonable. I've a boy, a mere baby, up in that old cabin near the Comet 
Ranch and he is dying by degrees from thirst. That boy's my very heart and 
soul, my life, and I am going mad seeing him die and not being able to save him. 
I was forced to sell my horse to your foreman last week, for I had no water to 
give her. Tonight the boy was worse and I could not stand it. Pinto could have 
taken us to a better place." 

"I did not know you were married — and your wife?" 

Gordon's lips twitched. "She died last year." 

It had been many years since Wentworth had shed tears, but quick, sym- 
pathetic ones sprang to the surface now. 

"Where are you working?" 

"I haven't been working for a month; before that I was foreman of the 
Comet Ranch," Gordon was plainly growing impatient under these questions. 

"Did Rowlins fire you?" 

"He wanted me to spy on one of his men but I couldn't do it, so he told me 
he didn't need me any more. That's all there is to be said. You had better call 
the sheriff." 

Wentworth walked to the door. There was a rustle of crisp bills, then — 
"You may go, boys, I don't need you." 

When he returned he found Gordon standing before the fire and his Sigma 
Psi pin lying on the table. "You can send my pin back to President Gray in the 
morning and tell him I'm not fit to wear it." 

"Come, come, Gordon," Wentworth tried hard to make his voice steady. 
"My foreman is going to leave me the first of the month. The wages are good 
and I have an excellent housekeeper who would take good care of your son. 
Come, what do you say?" 

"Do you mean it?" — grey eyes looked long into brown ones. 

"Mean it !" Billy's voice rang out boyishly as he thrust Jack's pin back into 
his hand. "You bet I do and say, Gordon, you really weren't going to steal that 
horse, were you?" 

"On my honor, Wentworth, I wasn't. I couldn't bring myself to take her." 
As he was about to leave on Pinto, who had been saddled and brought round to 
the door, Gordon crossed the room and laid his hand on Wentwbrth's shoulder, 
"and to think Ted's life should be saved at the sign of the Sigma Psi." Si- 
lently the men clasped hands and even as they did so, raindrops beat against 
the window-pane and each drop seemed to say as it pattered on the roof, "We're 
all brothers as long as we wear the Sigma Psi pin." 

Victoria Nettel. 



[ 79 ] 



THE ALLERLEI 



Hmong ©ur Song Birbs 

MARJORIE BEELER.— A rather large bird of the "presidentus suffra- 
gettarum" species, commonly known as "Marg." It inhabits Nebraska during 
the summer months and spends its winters in Auburndale. The nest is placed in- 
Tin Can Alley and the favorite call is "Don't be so familiar." 

ELIZABETH BRANDOW — Commonly called "Beth." A long, slender 
bird, belonging to the "angelicus" species, having abundant dark plumage. It 
is a frequent inhabitant of the practici roomae and is a lover of peace, ft has 
a soft, sweet note and builds its nest with Shinny Bird in Seniorous Domus. 

JOSEPHINE EGERTON.— Commonly called "Joe." It is of the "jolly 
good fellowi" species; was formerly an inhabitant of Minnesota, but is now to 
be seen singing in the fields of Auburndale. This bird is known by its call 
which cannot be imitated. 

LILLIAN LANE.^Commonly called "Lil." It is of the "politus" species, 
an inhabitant of Utah but may be perceived in any western state in the summer. 
Its call is very sweet and is often punctuated by small notes as "Chet! Chet!" 
The nest of this bird can be seen in a Karandon Bush. 

GRACE LINDSAY. — It is of the "giggleus" species, being a small bird with 
fluffy auburn feathers, known by its call, "Te He! Te He!", uttered at frequent 

intervals. 

FLORENCE MYERS.— It is of the "able to do anythingus" species, a 
jolly bird and is always busy. May be perceived anywhere in Auburndale. The 
song is sweet and is heard frequently; always where mischief is. The nesting 
place during the winter is made in the "Alley." 

HILDA MacDO'NALD. — A pretty bird of Mexico. It is a busy bird of 
the "useless questionengous" species, with a very light fluffy plumage. The 
call is, "Why! How! When!" with a questioning inflexion of the notes. The 
nesting place is the Carter Tree. 

MARION SHIN N— Commonly called "Shinny." It is of the "amusingus 
conversation" species. A small bird but is always sure to let you know its 
whereabouts by its very sweet note, almost human. 

HELEN SCOTT.— Commonly called "Scotty." It is of the "never sit 
stillus" species. A small bird with rather light plumage and a frequent inhab- 
itant of Texas. The most striking characteristic is the short feathers falling 
over the upper head to the eyes. Its call is sweet and clear. 



[ 80 ] 



THE 22LLERLEI 



Zhc Hwafcener 

(Dedicated to Mrs. Martin's Work.) 

There's a teacher at Lasell 

Whose mind is broad, whose courage high ; 

She's the one who ever starts our days so well ; 

Her new thought in word and action 

Makes the commonplace sublime, 

She's a great and cheering spirit at Lasell. 

I. Chorus. 

Cheer, cheer, cheer for the glorious work that 

Lifts us out of petty self, 

And with steady will compels 

Our latent powers to excel 

In an atmosphere of truth and love and health. 



In each living moment's measure 

We are taught to think and feel 

An eternity of power and pleasure near ; 

With our hearts uplifted high. 

Radiant face and sparkling eye, 

All harmonies of the universe are here. 

II. Chorus. 

'Wake, 'wake, 'wake, in soul and body ! 

We are ready for the day; 

Thus our thinking makes our future, 

And our work as glad as play. 

And with all our quickened power cheers the way. 



[ 81 ] 



THE &2LLERLEI 








Aesthetic Dancing — An innovation for the development of grace in our 
Seniors; incidentally those others who are fortunate enough to have gym on 
Friday afternoon ; productive of fear that our beloved Seniors may become so 
graceful that they will flit away from! us too soon, as the leaves of autumn blown 
by the Zephyrs. 

Appetite — The first acquisition of a girl after entering Lasell. 

Angel Row — A corridor in Cushman Hall noted for the beauty and va- 
riety of the angels (?) inhabiting it; movable as to place. This year some 
suggest that Miss Wool-ridge's corridor might be so named. 

Band — A hair and ear decoration; when its latter function becomes too 
prominent the wearer is usually forced to change it. 

Birthday-box — A wooden box Which in some schools attains immense 
proportions. It is sent from home filled with all sorts of goodies; special ap- 
plication — in Lasell it refers to a box of chocolates, with the compliments of 
the school. 

Class Meeting — A select assembly of sputterers in which each one knows 
just the thing which wi 1 l make for class fame and glory; and in which there is 
much groaning and gnashing of teeth on the non-acceptance of each one's pet 
hobby; — synonym — common occurrence when applied to Seniors and Juniors. 

Dreams — These are of several varieties at Lasell; there are those which 
fond young damsels dream of home and mother fair; there are those which 
fond young supies eat, and ride the dread nightmare. (The latter are made of 
cheese and are found principally at Pickard.) 

Ease — A state of being of which Allerlei officers know nothing. 

Extension of Lights — Those awful nights when work piles up so, and 
it is so hard to make one's corridor teacher believe it. Among the Seniors, it 

[ 82 ] 



THE &ZLLERLEI 



means signing up twice a month to study around the table all alone in the cold, 
dark hours of the night ; they say there are even times when it means staying 
home from Boston next day to make up sleep. 

Fruit-Cake — The delicious, long looked for article of diet which never 
comes ; the one way of having it is to bring it with you from home. 

Gown — A dress which has reached that degree of hobbling or other adorn- 
ment, that not only you but your friends enjoy wearing it. 

Hospital — The place we all fight shy of, because, perhaps we love our 
room-mates so. It has been said by those who have been there that it is far 
from being the dread place our fancy has pictured it. Syn. — "61". 

Hot-Dogs — A variety of the genus canine, having neither feet, head nor 
tail, used as an article of sustenance. 

Indisposed — That indefinite, yet serious, illness with which some of us 
are afflicted Sunday morning. 

Juniors — The most sought after class in school; sought after by girls 
classifying, by Seniors for supes, by Sophomores for overalls and by Freshmen 
as examples. 

Kimono — A flowing robe of many colors whose brilliant hues are oft-times 
dulled by much usage. 

Lecture — A bi-weekly occurrence; on Thursday evening it means salad 
for dinner, everyone dressed particularly well, and a chance to sit next one's 
"crush" from 7:45 until 9 or even 9:30, unless one chance to be in love with a 
Senior. On Saturday afternoon it 'means that one can not start for either 
Boston, Wellesley or Waltham until 2:30. 

Mousse — A form of ice-cream which makes a sound when you cut it. 

Monday — The day for catching up one's lessons (maybe) ; for young men 
callers (sometimes) ; for a trip to Boston (twice a term) ; and for cleaning 
one's room (always?). 

Name-Tape — A necessity of life. (So defined by Mrs. Hilbourn.) 

Opera — A musical diversion for which we are all clamorous the first of 
year; this enthusiasm recedes when we are "drawn" just the evening of an ex- 
citing center-ball game. 

Pickard — The Mecca of all Lasell girls. 

Practice-Period — A work, labor or toil. It is like bread in that it is 
often cut. Miss Hotchkiss is the avenging goddess who sees to the just retri- 
bution of culprits in this matter. 

Quick — The sort of motions we make when we get up at 7:25. 

Radiator — A musical instrument placed in each room at Lasell, which 
has a sort of humming or buzzing sound. Some declare that this instrument 



[ 83 ] 



THE SZLLERLEI 



also radiates heat, but on these cold Eastern mornings it is a fact hard to believe. 

Restriction List — The newest and worst torture of a school-girl's inqui- 
sition. The one question now asked is, "Are you on the Restriction List?" or 
"Am I ?" all with bated breath. Then in anxious or angry tones when the an- 
swer is in the affirmative, "What have I done?" 

Strong-Box — An article, which is supposed to be used for jewels and 
trunk keys, especially precious to a Senior, but of which a Junior is very fond 
just before time to take caps and gowns. 

Supe — Once the most necessary appendage to a Senior, with various duties 
such as bed-making and cleaning; now she approaches and expensive luxury. 
It has been said, however, that she is 1 as beloved by the aforesaid Senior as in the 
old days when she was a necessity. 

Sweater — A garment worn on almost every occasion, especially to break- 
fast when time is limited. It is worn in almost every sort of weather, and is 
strenuously objected to by Mrs. Martin as failing to preserve the lines of grace. 

Tacks — The tabooed article, both for diet and for wall decoration. 

Undergraduate — The scum of the earth. (So defined by the Seniors.) 

Voting Contest — An unceremonious comparing of notes on the school 
superlatives. 

Walking Card — A big placard put up in each corridor on which we would 
record the time we walk, if we could only remember. 

Wellesley — A village near Auburndale, much visited by Lasell girls, 
possibly because it is such a center of learning. 

X-Y-Z — A young female, the unknown quantity, whom Miss Witherbee so 
often addresses. 

The Optimist : 

Examination, 
Anticipation, 
No preparation, 
Some bluffation, 
Realization. 

The Pessimist : 

Examination, 
Much perspiration, 
No recreation, 
Nervous prostration, 
All flunkation, 
Humiliation. 



[ 84 ] 



i^V. 



kJ 




I i V Wi ^ A ""^ <• * .* X a' - 



^==#V<fc^ 



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I 









[ 85 ] 



THE &£LLERLEI 




Slams anb Bangs 

F you can't laugh at the jokes of the age, 
Just laugh at the age of the jokes." 

A. Merrill (discussing medicine at table), "Have you evei 
taken osteopathy?" 

G. Bettcher: "No, what color is it?" 

Miss Witherbee: "Principal parts of think are ?" 

A. Adelsdorf (hesitatingly) : "Think, . . . thank . . . . " 
M. P. W. : "The participle is gethunken, I suppose !" 

Winnie had a hobble skirt ; 

'Twas tied round with a bow. 
And everywhere that Winnie went, 

She simply could not go. 

Miss Potter (to Florence Jones in Chapel) : "Anyone absent in your line. 
Miss Tones?" 

F. J. : "No, thank you." 

Madee Simes (at table) : "Whv. fust think, girls, there was Caruso eating 
a sandwich right out loud in Rector's!" 

E. Heubner (much excited over wine home Xmas) : "Yes, when we gel 
to Buffalo, they're going to back us right into the falls." 

One Soph to another, who had been absent for the past week: "Well, how 
do you feel after your illness?" 

Other, politely : "Quite myself again, thank you." 
First Soph: "Oh, dear, how unfortunate!" 

Miss Potter (Junior Bible) : "Miss Graham, can you tell us something 
pathetic that happened to John the Baptist after he was beheaded?" 
R. Graham: "Didn't he smile after he was beheaded?" 



[ 86 ] 



THE &FLLERLEI 



Overheard in Library : "How do you spell the roll you eat ; is it r-o-a-1 
or r-o-l-e?" 

Why should watermelon be a good name for the Leaves? Because its in- 
sides are really red. 

Miss Chapman: "Meaning of rusticity f 
D. Dean : "Growing old and getting rusty." 

Of what flour is aviation bread made ? Graham and White. 

Miss Potter: "Florence Myers' nickname should not be 'Flossie', but 
Flossie-phy." We wonder why? 

Wouldn't you smile to see — ■ 

May Beardsley without a crush? 

May Martincourt without a rat? 

Elsie Fies working? 

Grace Harvey with sleeves in her dress? 

Carter Hall minus "Kaufhe"? 

Elizabeth Edson not studying? 

Winifred Whittlesey without her beauty book? 

Peggv Clark without her curling iron? 

Grace Alexander without a grouch? 

Dot Beacon and To Edgerton being quiet? 

Bess Brown not at study hall ? 

Doris Powers not writing letters? 

Helen Sayre not talking to a teacher? 

"Shinny" and "Micky" acting dignified? 

Marion Joslin staying away from practice kitchen ? 

Margaret Jones not giggling? 

Gladys Lawton without a pencil in her hair? 

Florence Jones not eating? 

Wanted — A telephone in every room. 

Wanted — A chute from window in gym to dining-room, for use of Carter 
Hall inhabitants. 

Wanted — The art of saying something, not talking. — Sophomore Class. 

[ M ] 



THE StfLLERLEI 




[ 88 ] 




[ 89 ] 



^Advertisements 



E. T. SLATTERY COMPANY 

— — Opposite Boston Common 

154, 155 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 

New Appareling 

FOR WOMEN, MISSES AND SMALL WOMEN 

CI^Tne E. T. Slattery Company announce the completion of their Spring and Summer stocks, 

which include all the late fashions from the best designers in Europe and America. 

€£,Notable in the exhibits are the Suits, Coats, Gowns, Waists, Millinery, Dresses, 

Neckwear, Gloves, Jewelry and Muslin Underwear. 

Note. — High quality at the E. T. Slattery Company does not mean high prices, 




THE absolute purity, which, from the 
beginning of our business down to 
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Samoset Chocolates Co. 



WHITE MOUNTAINS 



®Ije Itellnm? an& Atm?x 



INTERVALE, N. H. 

C. The Bellevue offers first class accommoda- 
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CL Intervale has great climatic advantages. 
The air is very dry and bracing, as great 
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resort. 

C Special attention is given to the pleasure 
of winter parties. First-class livery in con- 
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€L For further information address the pro- 
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J. A. BARNES' SONS 



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Cbanblet & Co. 



151 Tremont St,., Boston. 



Dry Goods Retailers and 
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Compliments of 

JL % j^irarna $c do. 

Tremont Street and Temple Place 

BOSTON 



Wc\s AU?rl?t for 1912 uriabea to txyxtzz 
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[ Hi ] 



Advertisements 



THE PEMBERTON 

Auburndale, Mass. 

ATTRACTIVE HOUSL CONVENIENCES 

FINE LAWNS MAGNIFICENT TREES 
DRY, HEALTHFUL CLIMATE EXCELLENT TABLE 



LAURA C. MACLEOD, 

230 Woodland Road 



Dr. Eugene U. Ufford 
ifttttat 

75 CENTRAL STREET, AUBURNDALE 

Office Hours : 
2 to S.30 P. M. Evenings by appointment 

TELEPHONE, NEWTON WEST 439-2 



At 

nfeikBi?}} jftm 

you'll find to eat 
Whatever to your taste is meet. 
Fudge cake famed the country thru, 
Waffles freshly baked for you, 
Cinnamon toast and marmalade, 
Chocolate hot, or lemonade, 
Refreshments, entertainment, friends 
All these ®fte inn most gladly lends. 



C. F. HOVEY & CO. 

33 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON 

€L Carry at all times a very comprehensive and high-class assortment of Fashionable Hosiery 
Neckwear, Handkerchiefs, Veilings, Umbrellas and Tailored Suits for Traveling, and Gowns 
appropriate for all functions. 

€L In French and Domestic Under Garments we are able to offer an unusually wide selection. 

€£ Our New Millinery Department displays all the latest style models from Europe's Fashion 
Centers. 

€£ Our Shoe Department presents a standard, popular-priced shoe, includimg in its wide 
range of styles, Pumps, Oxfords, Ribbon Ties, One- Two- and Three-Eyelet Ties in 
Turns and Goodyear Welt. Materials comprise: Suedes, Buck, Patent Colt, Velvet, 
Romaine, Cravenette, Black or Tan Russia Kid, White Canvas and newest seasonable 
novelties. These shoes have been heretofore retailed by us 
for $4.00, but since March 1 , 1 9 1 1 , the new price has 
been placed (to continue indefinitely) at 

[to] 



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^Advertisements 



3vx*> ®k* 3\vx\%\ 

202 Sartmoutly &tmt, InBtott, iflaaaarljuBettfii 

Only Place of Business 

Fresh Violets three times a day Special discount to students 

ROSES -ORCHIDS 

Telephone 3128-4 Back Bay 



A. l^touttU $c (So. 



24 Winter ^trrrt 



Diamond Merchants 



and dealers in all desirable novelties 
connected with the jewelry business 



Cut Glass, Bronzes, 
Fancy Jewelry, 
Whist Prizes 



WRIGHT & DITSON'S 

Catalogue of Summer Sports is out. 
Copy free to any address. 

'Base Ball Tennis Qolf 

cArcfyezy Ctoquet 

^Bathing Suits Sweaters jerseys 

Athletic Uniforms a Specialty 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

NEW YORK CAMBRIDGE CHICAGO 

SAN FRANCISCO and PROVIDENCE 



iEtigltfib ®?a Slnums 

(incorporated) 

Office, 160 Tremont Street, Boston 

Telephone, Oxford 2782 



[ v] 



Advertisements 



Lasell Seminary 

AUBURNDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 




OFF TO LEXINGTON AND CONCORD 



Ten miles from Boston, and within easy reach of Lexington, Concord, 
Cambridge, Salem, Plymouth and many other places richly associated with 
the lives of American statesmen, poets and philosophers and with romantic 
events of American history. During favorable seasons of the year excur- 
sions to some of these points are of almost daily occurrence. 

Send for catalogue. 

G. M. WINSLOW, Ph. D., Principal. 

[ w" ] 



A dvertisement s 



Delicious Chocolates 



Bonbons, Ice Cream Sodas, 

College Ices, Hot Chocolate 



146 TREMONT ST., 414 BOYLSTON ST. 
139 SUMMER STREET 

Look for the BL UE Sign 

Home-Made Cake, Pastry, Rolls, etc., for 
sale in large or small quantities 



TAYLOR BLOCK WELLESLEY SQ. 

Up One Flight. Tel. 136-3 Wellesley 

BASSETFS SELECT TOURS 

Since Eighteen Hundred Ninety-Seven 

To the Picturesque and Popular 

Resorts of New England and Canada 

Fall and Wintez Outings to the 

WHITE MOUNTAINS 

by the students of LASELL. 



Seth C. Bassett, Manager 

Haverhill, Mass. 



¥ 



Ralph L. Pollard 

ODpttrtatt 

No. 406 Boylston Street, 
Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Connection 



¥ 



PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY 



ABELL 



Btnhxtt mb (gift #f?0p 



WELLESLEY 



Art Goods, Pictures 

Developing and Printing 

for Amateurs 

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY 



[ vii ] 



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Electric City Engraving Co. 
Buffalo, NY 



WE MADE THE ENGRAVINGS FOR THIS BOOK. 

[ « ]